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the federal aviation administration saying that these should be put off. they say the law allows the faa and the administration to cut somewhere else in the 16 billion-dollar annual budget of the faa. they say the way the faa were cuts makes the delays even worse. >> under the applicable laws. the faa has the authority or the discretion to find the money elsewhere. not to lay off the workers. and, therefore, to protect the traveling and shipping public, the faa should not furlough the air traffic controllers. now congressional republicans charge the way the administration has structured this is simply for political reasons. the administration says that's absolutely not the case. they say the way is law isten o other choices than to furlough these air traffic controller if they have to reach the savings that the law requires, shep. >> >> shepard: we are expecting it to say four different flight delays faa is saying. airlines anywhere between 6700. about a quarter of the flight traffic in this country daily. in a statement the faa says they will be working with the airlines and using traff
. now i'll ask about the faa furloughs, which started yesterday. a group of almost the entire airline industry, including air traffic controller unions, flight attendants, pilot unions, and the industry itself, have written denis mcdonough and the white house a letter saying that the faa should be granted flexibility so they don't have to furlough the air traffic controllers. what do you say to this broad coalition? they say that other agencies have been given such flexibility and they believe the faa should have the same flexibility. >> let me give you some facts. the department of transportation is required by law to cut about $1 billion between now and the end of september; $637 million of that comes from the faa. the faa has initiated a series of cost-saving measures for personnel and non-personnel related, including a hiring freeze, restrictions on travel, termination of certain temporary employees, and reductions to contracts, among other savings. but furloughs cannot be avoided. seventy percent of the faa's operations budget is personnel. the faa must furlough 47,000 employees
. a couple thoughts on this. one is faa knew this was coming for two years, had a long time plan, bat and you're seeing is controllers are being laid off at the same rate for the big facilities, as they are for the smaller ones. you think faa would say, let's see where most of the people or traveling and keep those fully staffed and be a little more surgical on the smaller airports. >> shepard: sounds like a lot of this is politics. >> does seem rather odd but i don't see the controllers behind it but the administration wants to make sure everybody feels the pain here. >> does that seem understandable to you? >> not real ly. it doesn't. this is one of our great assets in this country, the ability to move across the country, and yet the government is getting in the way of this to prove a political point. we have seen the faa budget for controllers rise 50%, and traffic is down 27%. so we're throwing more money to handle less of a problem, yet now is the time we chose to start making the american people feel the pain? it just doesn't make sense. >> shepard: the american people are already feeli
that faa staff have had to be furloughed, then you may well be looking for someone to blame. and luckily enough, republicans are at the ready and know exactly who's responsible. >> as a result of the administration's poor planning, i would argue political motives, thousands of people were stuck on tarmacs over the last few days. the faa's mismanagement of this issue is a source of bipartisan frustration. our goal here shouldn't be to score political points on the backs of weary travelers. it should be to fix the problem. >> let's see. our goal here shouldn't to be to score political points. since when did mitch mcconnell outgrow his need to scoring political points? and isn't this what republicans have been doing for the last five years? but today, this very broadcast, has become the victim of the ludicrous sequester. because we've been in discussions with representative january schakowsky of illinois, who this week is promoting a bill that would put 50,000 public servants, such as police officers and firefighters, back to work. it is the exact opposite of the sequester and seemed like a
for more flight delays triggered by the sequester. some of the busiest airports fell behind schedule. faa furloughs went into effect leaving fewer air traffic controllers on the job and we have more from abc's matt gutman. >> reporter: the delays piled up in charlotte. waits up to 75 minutes at baltimore washington and at all three new york airports. >> when you have cuts like this, it's not good. it's one of the very few jobs, i think, that should not have one. >> reporter: the faa didn't mince words, blaming most of the backlog on federal budget cuts. the agency said, the crunch forced it to furlough its air traffic controllers one day every other week. it saves the agency nearly $640 million, but the faa says it could cost travelers 90-minute delays on 6,700 flights every day. and the early numbers show delays at baltimore washington anew york's laguardia, spiking fourfold over last monday. part of that could be weather related. but at other airports like philadelphia, not much change. to see for ourselves, we boarded a flight in miami for orlando. here's the confusing thing. the fligh
: the faa releasing a statement saying it will quote, be working with the airlines and using a comprehensive set of air traffic management tools to minimize the delays and impacts of lower staffing as we move into the busy summer season. do you find that reassuring? i'm not sure i do. good morning stuart. stuart varney from the fox business network. stuart couldn't we move money over from consultants and grants to help folks out in the control tower? >> let me spell out what we're talking about. $500 million this year for consultants. $474 million in wrapts grants to make communities more liveable and sustainable. obvious, question, martha, take some money out of the consultants bucket and put it into air traffic controlsers bucket to avoid delays. president says can't do that. i don't have the flexibility to target nonessentials. can't do it. so the republicans introduced a bill that would specifically give the president that flexibility, to avoid this pain. he threatened to veto it. that's where we stand this morning. more cuts are coming. more delays are coming. the president does not wan
because the faa is being forced to furlough thousands of air traffic controllers. abc's matt gutman has more from miami. good morning, matt. >> reporter: good morning, josh. the delays are already piling up. new york area airports reporting delays of over an hour. l.a.x. over three hours overnight. this is just the start. the faa now warning that as many as 6,700 flights could be delayed every day.the sequestrac across-the-board budgets cuts across-the-board budgets cuts are forcing furloughs. fewer planes in the air translates into delays. about 5,000 planes in the air at a given time and fewer eyes in the tower, the faa is slowing air traffic for safety. planes could both be prevented from landing and taking off. those inevitable delays could cost travelers more than just their time. >> airlines may have to cut flights. that will drive up ticket prices. demand will be high. >> reporter: the only antidote? said senator chuck schumer. >> we need democrats and republicans to meet in the middle and end the sequestration that causes the problems. >> reporter: analysts said there's not much
, as the faa furlough air traffic controllers. leading to reports of flight delays across the country but they suggest it's nothing more than a political strategy to get travelers to campaign to reduce the budget in other areas that would not delays passengers. some of the spending and $500 million they are spending, quote consultants or the $325 million for supplies and travel. there is the department of transportation $474 million grant program that promises to make communities more livable and sustainable. you may recall tsa, different agency but speaks to the spending that our government level, recently okayed a $50 million contract for new uniforms. that is a lot of dough. are we spending it well. so tsa is under dhs which is not the same, the point is just that they spend and they spend and they spend. they found $50 million to spend over the tsa and uniforms when it comes to air traffic controllers, now they to furlough and cut back? >> the numbers are all there. you laid out important numbers there. $474 million to make communities more livable through the faa, honestly, money
as the national transportation safety board takes a closer look at one fire in particular just days after the faa approved boeing's plan to get its fleet back in the air. dan springer is live in seattle. dan? >> reporter: yeah, jon. the faa approved the battery fix even as the company answers tough questions about the fire back in january that led to the dreamliner fleet getting grounded. the plane's lithium ion battery sured a short which led to the failure of all eight cells. boeing's new plan includes a redesigned battery that has more insulation between the cells to prevent what's called thermal runaway. the battery charger has been redesigned to reduce the total amount of energy in the battery so it doesn't work as hard, and it's going to be in a better steel containment box that won't allow oxygen to fuel a fire. the ntsb put boeing on the defensive this morning about its assumptions that turned out to be wrong. >> what we can't do is we can't account for every single possible method of short circuit, particularly what we would consider the unknown unknowns. >> reporter: boeing says it has
at the airport. the f.a.a. imposing furloughs on thousands of employees. those cuts are being blamed on sequester. guess what? delays, delays, delays. >>steve: with fewer workers responsible for the same number of planes that means you're going to have to wait. here now stuart varney, we're not going to make him wait. the scare quester didn't work. now what they're trying to do is inflict pain. people are going to sit on planes, they're going to call their congressmen. "you've got to do something about it! " >> that's right. quick pop quiz. did you know the f.a.a., the people who run the air traffic system, this year they will spend $500 million on consultants, $325 million on supplies and travel, $474 million on grants to make communities more livable and sustainable. >>steve: are you saying there's money available where they don't have to furlough those guys? >> exactly. why don't you take some of that money and put it into the air traffic controllers' bucket so we don't have to have these delays? because the president says we don't have the flexibility. we cannot redirect spending. not allowed
is the marathon in london, by the way. we should point out that the faa has instituted a no-fly zone over watertown, massachusetts. amtrak has been suspended from new york to boston. to law enforcements across the country right now are focusing on this and stopping everything, putting it in lockdown mode. ambassador, thank you very much, phil mod, thank you very much. >> we have got the latest on the boston manhunt continuing throughout thebroadcast. >> we will speak with former u.s. marshal, who spent years chasing down fugitives. stay with us as our special live coverage continues. it's as simple as this. at bny mellon, our business is investments. managing them, moving them, making them work. we oversee 20% of the world's financial assets. and that gives us scale and insight no one else has. investment management combined with investment servicing. bringing the power of investments to people's lives. invested in the world. bny mellon. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the
? >> possible options for travelers now that it is day three of the faa furloughs longer airport wait time, longer tarmac wait time perhaps canceled flights all together. now they have filed a motion to place a moratorium on the rule saying airlines cannot let passengers remain on the tarmac for more than 3 hours. the motion notes 6700 flights will be delayed daily at 13 of the busiest airports now that the furloughs have started f. you add bad weather on ton of that it could get pretty ugly. if the tarmac rule does stay in place airlines may be forced to cancel flights and significantly disrupt travel plans. because they don't have the appropriate staff to go deal with the travel disruption. >> they are telling passengers there's always the bus. >> college, is it worth it or not worth it? >> there is a growing number of people saying it's not worth it. no longer guarantees success. even a good enough job where you make enough money to pay back your student loan. the average college grad is graduating with 28,000 in debt. that's why some high school grads are starting their own businesses
-long delays because apparently the sequester is going to cause it. the f.a.a. beginning furloughs for employees, including 15,000 air traffic controllers. some say it's purely political. >> when the f.a.a. was shut down a few years ago, flights weren't affected. it seems to me like there is a request or directive out there to take steps so that passengers will be inconvenienced and that they'll call their elected officials to get them to take action. >>gretchen: some of the nation's busiest airport including in new york and washington already experiencing delays and longer wait times for security. >> real-life drama for actress reese witherspoon. the oscar winner arrested for disorderly conduct in atlanta after her husband was apparently pulled over for a d.u.i. as he was given a sobriety test reece reportedly got out of the car. the officers told her to get out of the car but she didn't listen. she said do you know my name? you'll be on the evening news. later she apologized. >>steve: is that her mug shot? >>gretchen: it was. >>steve: i think you're supposed to be looking at the
that could be starting today, folks. the faa beginning furloughs, forced days off for their employees, including 15,000 air traffic controllers. airports across the country are bracing for an hour-long debase in many cases. critics say this move they believe is political. let's find out what peter goelz thinks about, former director of the nts. about, the national transportation safety board. peter, thanks for being here. good to see you. >> good to see you. martha: we're told today could have some pretty big snarls at the nation's airport. what do you think? >> i think we'll see some slow-ups. the federal aviation administration is taking 60% of the cuts at dot. that is $647 million in cuts. people are going to be laid off and things are going to go slowly. martha: why do you think that is, that they're bearing such a brunt of these budget cuts? >> at d.o.t. they have five modes, pipelines, trails, trucks, aviation. aviation is where the big programs are, the big money are and where the most employees are. not only air traffic controllers but air inspectors and the whole certificatio
an advisory group. another thing that airline passengers might notice, longer flight delays. faa furloughing 10% of workforce because of federal spending cuts and causing delays of up to two hours at airports in los angeles, new york, and washington, d.c. our casey wian live with more on what's going on. what's going on, casey? >> reporter: wolf, another rough evening for travelers here at los angeles international airport. up to 80% of departures delayed, and 20% of arrivals, according to flightview.com. due to faa staffing issues, workforce reductions, that started sunday night. erin was on a flight sunday night from las vegas to l.a. little did she know, forced spending cuts began the same day, reducing the number of air traffic controllers on duty. the result? major flight delays. >> on an 8:25, and when i rebooked, our departure time, 1:45 a.m. a couple airline employees said it was due to fog, and a couple says it was due to sequestration. >> reporter: actually it was both according to air traffic union rep, who was working sunday night. there are four parallel runways that can operate
to overheating. boeing redesigned the system and the f.a.a. approved the changes. the grounding has cost boeing an estimated $600 million. the boy scouts of america said today they will ask their national council to vote on a proposal that would permit gay boy scouts but continue to ban gay leaders. the organization, which has long banned gays, said the new direction is based on survey results from the scouting community. th is scheduled for late oday, the dow jones industrial ara g10 pnts tt 14,547. the nasdaq rose more than 39 points to close at 3,206. for the week, the dow lost 2%. the nasdaq fell 2.7%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we close the week and this most unusual day of news with the analysis of shields and brooks, syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, i used the word "extraordinary" at the top of the program. a major americ c in lockdown. your thoughts on seeing that. >> well, i mean, it's obviously reminiscent of 9/11 and a reminder of what this sort of a national trauma in particular a re
have to prepare for long lines. government budget cuts that kicked in last month are forcing the faa and other agencies to cut some spending. f furloughs kicked in yesterday. the agency will furlough some 15,000 air traffic controllers. because of the cuts airports say passengers should expect increased delays. the length of the delays will vary depending on the schedule and situation at each specific airport. employees at the epa, office of management and budget, also face furloughs starting this week. >>> residents and investigators continue their search today through the destruction in west, texas, to try to figure out what caused the fertilizer plant there to explode. investigators say they found the origin of the explosion, but they still don't know what caused the initial fire that led to the blast last wednesday. fertilizer company is working closely with authorities to aid the investigation. the death toll from the blast remains at 14. a public memorial for first responders will take place in the town later this week. by the way, all the presidents, ex and otherwise will be i
visitor programs certification from immigrations and forced them without being certified by the faa. according to g.a.o., 167 out of 434th flight training schools, 38% today do not have the required faa certification. i am told ice is often unaware when they revoke certification for flight training providers. i understand that ice is working with f.a.a. to thards issue. what updates and insurance consist you provide about ice's efforts to improve its communication with the f.a. toombings address this issue? >> i think we are very far along. by the way, senator, we're also moving from a new system governing institutions that educates student visa holders. this will help solve the problem. i will get to that. the silent screen process. under the present system, applicants for asylum must undergo a credible fear interview to determine whether they have a credible fear of persecution in his or her county of origin. but the officer determines that they have a credible fear, the application is a long for further consideration. this bill streamlines the process partly by allowing a screeni
an hour long. >> reporter: the faa is blaming the delays on across-the-board budget cuts which, it says, forced it on to furlough 15,000 air traffic controllers and other workers and were spacing out flights in the name of safety. several hundred flights delayed, less than the agency's prediction of 6,700 daily flight delays. but transportation secretary ray lahood warns abc, we might see an airplane apocalypse yet. >> we did not take into account weather activities. these delays could get extended beyond the 60 to 90 minutes. >> reporter: late monday, i decided to investigate the delays myself. taking a round-trip from miami -- not bad. taking off about 25 minutes late. to orlando -- it looks like we're about to take off about 50 minutes late. not too bad given the circumstances. and back. now, a lot of folks back in there gripe that probably the airports that the politicians and congressmen use, washington national, probably didn't have too many delays. it did. delays up to two hours. airline analysts say if this persists through the summer, we could see ticket prices start to rise. r
what they think. >> the f.a.a. as we see here, ordering a no-fly zone over the city. let's check in again. >> when look at the high school photo, you go how did this person get this far off course, you know, looks nice a nice kid. good friends with a number of people. when you look at his picture you go, how does it happen? >> jim we are on a little bit of a delay but the people being evacuated and we have seen a lot of families. >> is there a place, a bus they are getting on? where is their safe place that they are being evacuated from their home? >> you know, we are seeing a lot of people just walk the cars. there is one gentleman across the street loading his car with blank et cetera, but we have not seen any large scale way of transporting them from the scene. we have certainly not seen that. we have seen people walking down the street to other vehicles. i am trying to take a look down the street. i am not seeing anything that would -- anything out of the ordinary. >> you have to wonder. they are being advised not to the obvious streets. you have t
in sunday for nearly 50,000 employees. the faa is required to cut $637 million from its budget by the end of september. >>> and at least another inch of rain is expected today in parts of an already flood-ravaged midwest. at least six rivers in northern illinois have surged to record levels and thousands of residents have been displaced. the governor declared 44 counties disaster areas. missouri's governor has also declared a state of emergency. >>> and some momentary shock today after this a.p. tweet was posted, claiming, quote, two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. it turns out that the a.p. account was hacked and the erroneous tweet was taken down minutes later. the dow plunged more than 100 points on the news but quickly regained the losses once it was deemed false. a group known as the syrian electronic army has claimed responsibility for this tweet. an fbi spokesperson tells cnn the fbi is now investigating that hack. wolf? >> lisa sylvester, thanks very >> lisa sylvester, thanks very much. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> new images of the shootout
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)